Newsletters 2019

03/12 - Colloquium by Andreea Popescu

Colloquium


Andreea Popescu

Tilburg University

Andreea Popescu

Wednesday, 4th December @ 2:00 PM
“Contagion and Return Predictability in Asset Markets: A Lab Experiment”
Using a laboratory experiment, we investigate if contagion can emerge between two risky assets despite an absence of correlation among their fundamentals. To guide our experimental design, we use the ‘Two trees’ asset pricing model developed by Cochrane et al. (2007). The model makes time-series and cross-section return predictions following a shock to one of the assets’ dividend share . . .
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29/11 - Seminar by David Gill

Seminar


David Gill

Purdue University

David Gill

Monday, 2nd December @ 1:30 PM
“Cognitive Skills and the Development of Strategic Sophistication”
(with Eduardo Fe)
In this paper we investigate how observable cognitive skills influence the development of strategic sophistication. To answer this question, we study experimentally how psychometric measures of theory-of-mind and cognitive ability (or ‘fluid intelligence’) work together with age to determine the . . .
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28/11 - Social Media Workshop

Social Media Workshop at CESS

CESS will host Social Media Workshop

   Thursday, 5th December – from 9 AM to 6 PM
This workshop assembles a very diverse and inter-disciplinary group of scholars using social media as an integral part of their research. Each of the workshop participants will be presenting work or work-in-progress/designs that build on the theme of social media and experimentation. The goal is to highlight very innovative experimental approaches that incorporate social media into the design of experimental interventions but also into measuring behavioural outcomes.
More info

26/11 - Colloquium by Christian Zünd

Colloquium


Christian Zünd

University of Zurich

Christian Zünd

Wednesday, 27th November @ 2:00 PM
“Income Underreporting and Policy Effectiveness”
This paper demonstrates how corruption negatively impacts policy effectiveness in a program that is explicitly designed to be unsusceptible to bribery, clientelism, and the embezzlement of money: Brazil’s Bolsa Família program. Exploiting two natural experiments I estimate the program’s effectiveness in different years and municipalities to show that Bolsa Família’s effect on school enrollment increases by a third after a municipality has been subjected to a random anti-corruption audit . . .
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19/11 - Colloquium by Florian S. Schaffner

Colloquium


Florian S. Schaffner

University of Oxford

Florian S. Schaffner

Wednesday, 20th November @ 2:00 PM
“Affective Computing and Experimental Social Science”
Emotions influence attitude formation and behaviour of agents. Reliably measuring emotions in experimental research is difficult, however, since self-reported measures are subject to a number of crucial limitations. In this pre-analysis plan, I outline how I will use facial emotion recognition software to unobtrusively measure the emotional reactions of participants. . .
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12/11 - Colloquium by Pepper D. Culpepper

Colloquium


Pepper D. Culpepper

Blavatnik School of Government

Wednesday, 13th November @ 2:00 PM
“How the Public Responds to Media Representations of Bankers in the US and the UK”
This talk presents the design and pilot results of two sets of survey experiments conducted on in the United States and the United Kingdom to assess how media framing influences public opinion. The experiments expose respondents to a variety of frames that correspond to the way the media actually covers banking in the two countries and measures…
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11/11 - Colloquium by Laura Gee

Seminar


Laura Gee

Tufts University

Monday, 11th November @ 2:30 PM
“The Effect of Observation and Deception in Field Experiments: Evidence from a Two-sided Audit Study”
One of the strengths of natural field experiments is that subjects’ actions are observed while they are unaware they are in an experiment.  This might be particularly important for actions that are affected by implicit biases.  One common natural field experimental design is the use of resume audit studies.  In a traditional audit study the experimenter sends fictitious…
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04/11 - Colloquium by Andrew Lewis

Seminar


Laura Gee

Tufts University

Monday, 11th November @ 2:30 PM
“The Effect of Observation and Deception in Field Experiments: Evidence from a Two-sided Audit Study”
One of the strengths of natural field experiments is that subjects’ actions are observed while they are unaware they are in an experiment.  This might be particularly important for actions that are affected by implicit biases.  One common natural field experimental design is the use of resume audit studies.  In a traditional audit study the experimenter sends fictitious…
Read more

29/10 - Colloquium by Simon Finster

Colloquium


Simon Finster

University of Oxford

Wednesday, 30th October @ 2:00 PM
“An Experimental Study of Strategic Bidding in First-Price Auctions for Differentiated Goods”
I study theoretically and experimentally the performance of four different first-price auction designs (treatments): the Product-Mix auction, standard simultaneous auctions, and two sequential auction formats. Two differentiated varieties are for sale, and buyers wish to buy at most one of them. While the Product-Mix auction offers an intuitive design for…
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22/10 - Colloquium by Paola Solimena

Colloquium


Paola Solimena

University of Oxford

Wednesday, 23rd October @ 2:00 PM
“Costly Signaling in International Politics: Evidence from a Survey Experiment”
Read more

16/10 - Colloquium by Jeff Gill

Seminar


Jeff Gill

American University

Thursday, 17th October @ 3:30 PM
“Models for Identifying Substantive Clusters and Fitted Subclusters in Social Science Data”
Unseen grouping, often called latent clustering, is a common feature in social science data. Subjects may intentionally or unintentionally group themselves in ways that complicate the statistical analysis of substantively important relationships. This work introduces a new model-based clustering design which incorporates two sources of heterogeneity. The first source…
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14/10 - Colloquium by Bertil Tungodden

Seminar


Bertil Tungodden

Norwegian School of Economics

Tuesday, 15th October @ 12:45 PM
“Fairness Across the World: Experimental Evidence”
Read more

08/10 - Michaelmas 2019

Dear all,

Welcome back to Michaelmas 2019. We have lots of great events lined up for you this term and beyond so get ready to do some experimental social science!

Seminars & Colloquia


 

Seminar (joint with Oxford’s Dept. of Economics)


Bertil Tungodden

 

15th October @ 12:45 PM

“Fairness Across the World: Experimental Evidence”

 

Seminar


Jeff Gill

 

17th October @ 3:30 PM

“Models for Identifying Substantive Clusters and Fitted Subclusters in Social Science Data”

Colloquium


Paola Solimena

 

23rd October @ 2:00 PM

 

Colloquium


Simon Finster

 

30th October @ 2:00 PM

“An Experimental Study of Strategic Bidding in First-Price Auctions for Differentiated Goods”

 

Colloquium


Andrew Lewis

 

6th November @ 2:00 PM

“Discrimination and Tolerance for Transgression in Candidate Evaluation”

 

Seminar (joint with Oxford’s Dept. of Economics)


Laura Gee

 

11th November @ 2:30 PM

“The Effect of Observation and Deception in Field Experiments: Evidence from a Two-sided Audit Study”

 

Colloquium


Pepper D. Culpepper

 

13th November @ 2:00 PM

“How the Public Responds to Media Representations of Bankers in the US and the UK”

 

Colloquium


Florian S. Schaffner

 

20th November @ 2:00 PM

Affective Computing and Experimental Social Science

 

Colloquium


Christian Zünd

 

27th November @ 2:00 PM

 

Seminar


David Gill

 

2nd December @ 1:30 PM

“Cognitive Skills and the Development of Strategic Sophistication”

 

Seminar


Andreea Popescu

 

4th December @ 2:00 PM

“Contagion and Return Predictability in Asset Markets: A Lab Experiment”

 

We are very pleased to announce the workshop oTree: An Introduction to Programming Online Experiments for the Social Sciences to be held at Nuffield College 9th October 2019.oTree is a framework to run experiments both online and in the lab. The workshop is aimed at participants with no prior knowledge of oTree. After the workshop participants will be able to create single and multi-player experiments. The workshop will be hands on and include a variety of exercises which will allow participants to immediately apply the covered material. A very basic understanding of python is required to attend the workshop. For people without prior knowledge of python a brief introduction into python is offered on the day prior to the workshop (8th October, from 3pm to 6pm). Alternatively, a few hours of self-study will be sufficient to acquire the necessary knowledge.

The workshop is open to faculty graduate students, but spaces are limited. Those interested in participating in the workshop should send an email to jonas.frey.dphil2017@said.oxford.edu. In the email, please specify if you want to attend the workshop and the python session or only the workshop.

Comparative Time-Sharing Experiments (CTSE)

We are very pleased to announce that we are in the process of planning the continuation of the Comparative Time-Sharing Experiments (CTSE). CTSE is intended to offer access to the four principal student and non-student online subject pools of the Centre of Experimental Social Sciences (CESS), Nuffield College located in the UK, Chile, India and China, to researchers free of charge. CTSE thus allows graduate students of the University of Oxford and CESS to conduct subsidised experiments in China, Chile, and India.Current graduate students wishing to participate should look out for a link to submit during the Michaelmas term.

Find more information about CTSE here: https://cess-nuffield.nuff.ox.ac.uk/ctse/

 

We are pleased to announce the Seventh International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Social Sciences (IMEBESS) at the University of Lyon, Lyon, France, on 14-16 May 2020.

IMEBESS intends to bring together researchers in all areas of the social sciences who are interested in experimental methods. We believe that behavioural economics is increasingly informed by a very diverse range of research traditions. Hence, we are particularly interested in the participation of all social science disciplines with an interest in experimental and behavioural research, including anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology.

Read more here as the call for papers will be announced soon: http://imebess.org.

17/06 - Seminar by Erik Mohlin & Colloquium by Rachel Bernhard

Seminar


Erik Mohlin

Lund University

Monday, 17th June @ 1:30 PM
“Decency”
We develop a formal theory of decency. Shared values and understandings give rise to social norms. Norms may mandate collectively optimal behavior, but they need not do so. Furthermore, behavior can be affected by social values even if it stops short of norm compliance. Seeking stronger predictions, we propose a structural model of social values; society…
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Colloquium


Rachel Bernhard

University of Oxford

Tuesday, 18th June @ 1:30 PM
“High Standards? Candidate Height (and Race and Gender) Drives Vote Choice”
Data shows that CEOs and presidents tend to be taller than the population average, but such correlations are prone to many confounding explanations. Does taste-based discrimination explain this finding? In two studies using a new type of conjoint survey experiment, I manipulate perceptions of candidates’ heights in a mock debate, and vary the race and gender of…
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12/06 - Colloquium by Jiakun Zheng

Colloquium


Jiakun Zheng

Toulouse School of Economics

Thursday, 13th June @ 1:30 PM
“Too Risky to Hedge: an Experiment on Narrow Framing”
When making a series of decisions at the same time, individuals tend to consider each decision separately rather than all of them jointly. This tendency, also known as narrow framing in behavioral economics, has been used to explain various financial behaviors such as under-diversification puzzle. When considering how much insurance to buy, individuals face…
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07/06 - Colloquia: Eugen Dimant & Tanushree Goyal

Colloquium


Eugen Dimant

University of Pennsylvania

Monday, 10th June @ 1:30 PM
“It’s Not A Lie If You Believe It: On Norms, Self-Serving Belief Distortion, and Lying”
This paper focuses on belief manipulation in the context of lying decisions. We employ a two-stage variant of a cheating paradigm, in which subjects’ beliefs are elicited in stage 1 before performing the dice task in stage 2. In stage 1, a) we elicit the subjects’ beliefs about majoritarian (i) behavior or (ii) normative beliefs in a previous session, and b) we vary whether….
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Colloquium


Tanushree Goyal

University of Oxford

Tuesday, 11th June @ 1:30 PM
“Women Behind Women: How Female Politicians Reduce the Political Gender Gap in Urban India”
Examining the natural experiment of quota assignment in Delhi complemented with qualitative data and original survey of 1664 citizens, this paper provides evidence that women’s political entry substantively improves political involvement for women. In addition to exposure effects, this paper argues that women’s entry into politics changes the way citizens are…
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27/05 - Colloquium by Andreas Wiedemann

Colloquium


Andreas Wiedemann

University of Oxford

Tuesday, 28th May @ 1:30 PM
“Market vs States: When do Voters Support Credit-Based over Publicly-Funded Social Policies?”
When do voters prefer credit-funded social policies over tax-financed welfare? Some countries fund education publicly, offer generous social insurance systems, or provide public housing, in others higher education is privately funded, social insurance is limited, housing is largely market-driven. Yet we know little about voters’ preferences over…
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14/05 - Colloquium by Francesco Salustri & Seminar by Donald Green

Colloquium


Francesco Salustri

University of Oxford

Tuesday, 14th May @ 1:30 PM
“Crowdfunding for Health Research Projects: an Online Experiment”
The high costs of clinical trials and drug development inhibit access and speed of translation of new pharmaceutical innovations. Patents are commonly used as a means to incentivise future drug development further increasing the costs of new marketed drugs by restricting access to research and development. To overcome these limitations, a…
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Seminar


Donald Green

Columbia University

Wednesday, 15th May @ 4:00 PM
“Adaptive Experimental Design: Prospects and Applications in Political Science”
Experimental researchers in political science frequently face the following inference problem: which of several treatment arms produces the greatest return, where returns may be expressed in terms of campaign donations, votes for a candidate, or some other support for a political cause? Multi-arm trials are typically conducted using a static design in which fixed…
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07/05 - Colloquium by Lonie Sebagh

Colloquium


Lonie Sebagh

University of Oxford

Tuesday, 7th May @ 1:30 PM
“Cybercriminal Networks’ Responses to Slander, Sybil, and Platform Shutdown Operations in Online Criminal Marketplaces – a Laboratory Experiment”
This project proposes to use social laboratory experiments, never before used in the field of cybercrime, in order to better understand and model cybercriminal networks’ responses to Law Enforcement disruption operations in online criminal marketplaces. These marketplaces are defined as platforms enabling the sale and purchase of illegal goods and…
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01/05 - Seminar by Yonatan Lupu

Seminar


Yonatan Lupu

George Washington University

Friday, 3rd May @ 3:30 PM
“Violence and Public Opinion in Ukraine: An Experimental Analysis”
How does targeting in armed conflict affect public opinion?  Armed actors choose between targeting militaries and civilians, and further choose whether to target civilians discriminately or indiscriminately. Existing work suggests these choices are based in part on the effects of targeting on public opinion, yet the causal link between these variables has not…
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29/04 - Colloquium by Ben Ansell & Seminar by Alexander Cappelen

Colloquium


Ben Ansell

University of Oxford

Tuesday, 30th April @ 1:30 PM
“Wealth Inequality, Income Inequality and Experimental Redistributive Behaviour”
Do people view inequality in unearned wealth and inequality in earned income differently when it comes to their preferences over redistribution?  In this experiment all participants receive a wealth endowment (possibly investible) before entering the lab and all also play a slider task that produces in-lab earnings. Participants are then asked to vote over…
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Seminar


Alexander Cappelen

NHH Norwegian School of Economics

Wednesday, 1st May @ 3:30 PM
“Cutthroat Capitalism Versus Cuddly Socialism: Are Americans More Meritocratic and Efficiency-Seeking than Scandinavians?”
There are striking differences in inequality and redistribution between the United States and Scandinavia. To study whether there are corresponding differences in social preferences, we conducted a large-scale international social preference experiment where Americans and Norwegians make distributive choices in identical environments. Combining the…
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23/04 - Seminar by Sevgi Yuksel

Seminar


 

Sevgi Yuksel

UC Santa Barbara

 

Wednesday, 24th April @ 3:30 PM
“How do People Choose Between Biased Information Sources? Evidence from a Laboratory Experiment”
We report an experiment designed to measure how (and how well) subjects choose between biased sources of instrumentally valuable information. Subjects choose between two information sources with opposing biases in order to inform their guesses of a binary state. By varying the nature of the bias, we vary whether it is optimal to consult sources biased towards….
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18/03 - Colloquium by Leah Rosenzweig

Colloquium


Leah Rosenzweig

Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST)

Tuesday, 19th March @ 1:30 PM
“Informality, Evictions, and Compliance: The State of the Social Contract in Lagos Nigeria”
Stark inequalities in the state’s treatment of its citizens can signal to some residents that the state is not upholding its end of the social contract. In urban “informal settlements” — where the lack of public services is particularly acute — the state may even threaten to destroy citizens’ homes and neighborhoods. How does variation in exposure to government-led…
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11/03 - Colloquium by Joe Kendall

Colloquium


Joe Kendall

University of Oxford

Wednesday, 13th March @ 1:30 PM
“An Integrated Model of Populist Party Strategy and the Spatial Dynamics of Political Distrust”
The project analyses the relationship between support for populist parties and how these parties frame particular issues. In particular, it looks at how support varies where parties ‘blur’ a given issues by taking an ambiguous policy stance, and how this blurring interacts with individual-level salience of the issue in question. Another key theoretical variable is the spatial…
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04/03 - Colloquium by Saurabh Pant & Seminar by Jan-Emmanuel de Neve & Clément Imbert

Colloquium


Saurabh Pant

Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST)

Tuesday, 5th March @ 1:30 PM
“Winning Hearts and Minds in Civil Wars: Governance, Leadership Change, and Support for Violence in Iraq”
The ‘hearts and minds’ model of counterinsurgency holds that civilians are less likely to support an insurgency if the government provides basic public services and security. Building on this model, we argue that a major political event that raises popular expectations of future public service and security provision will increase support for the government and decrease….
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Seminar


Jan-Emmanuel de Neve

University of Oxford

Clément Imbert

University of Warwick

Wednesday, 6th March @ 4:30 PM
“How to Improve Tax Compliance? Evidence from Countrywide Experiments in Belgium”
We study the impact of deterrence, tax morale, and simplifying information on tax compliance. We ran five experiments that span the tax process and vary the communication of the tax administration with the universe of taxpayers in Belgium. The results provide a clear picture across the experiments: (i) simplifying communication always increases…
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25/02 - Colloquium by Scott A. Tyson & Seminar by Karine Van Der Straeten

Colloquium


Scott A. Tyson

University of Rochester

Tuesday, 26th February @ 1:30 PM
“Sowing the Seeds: A Theory of Indoctrination and Counterinsurgency”
Insurgent groups are a persistent feature of the developing world, but what explains the political prominence of these organizations? Existing explanations tend to focus on the quality of governance, arguing that insurgent groups survive because governments are incapable of defeating them, however, this can occur through several distinct channels. In this…
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Seminar


Karine Van Der Straeten

Toulouse School of Economics

Wednesday, 27th February @ 3:30 PM
“Voting Corrupt Politicians Out of Office? Evidence from an Experiment in Paraguay”
This paper challenges the conventional wisdom that giving voters more power – both formally through the use of more ‘open’ electoral systems, and informally through easier access to information about politicians’ wrongdoings – will necessarily result in them voting corrupt politicians out of office. First, focusing on a comparison between closed-list and…
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18/02 - Colloquium by Jan Sauermann

Colloquium


Jan Sauermann

University of Cologne

Tuesday, 19th February @ 1:30 PM
“The Effects of Communication on the Occurrence of the Tyranny of the Majority under Voting by Veto”
The tyranny of the majority is one of the most frequently discussed problems of democracy in political theory. It arises when winning majorities are fixed and permanent, and there are no checks on the majority’s ability to dominate the minority. In this project, we investigate the effects of communication on the occurrence of majority domination. Theoretically…
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11/02 - Colloquium by Dominik Duell & Seminar by Roberto Weber

Colloquium


Dominik Duell

University of Essex

Tuesday, 12th February @ 1:30 PM
“The World on One Island: Formation and Deployment of Group Membership in Multi-Identity Societies”
We propose to implement a lab-in-the-field study on the island of Malekula, Vanuatu, to investigate cooperation within a heterogenous society. Vanuatu, per capita the most linguistically diverse country on earth, provides a perfect case in multiculturalism featuring unique variation in regional, tribal, religious, and linguistic group markers but a high degree of…
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Seminar


Roberto Weber

University of Zurich

Wednesday, 13th February @ 3:30 PM
“Revealed Privacy Preferences: Are Privacy Choices Rational?”
The development of effective privacy policies rests critically on the question of whether people are capable of engaging in rational tradeoffs regarding the use of their personal information. This study employs an economic approach to investigate the extent to which people’s decisions in this domain exhibit consistency with an underlying rational preference…
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05/02 - Seminar by Alexei Zakharov

Seminar


Alexei Zakharov

National Research University Higher School of Economics

Wednesday, 6th February @ 3:30 PM
“Social Status and Social Learning”
We studied the effect of unequal social status on social learning in an experimental game where individuals in a dyad made repeated attempts to guess the underlying state of the world. Several sets of survey questions were deployed to control for the subjective perception of social status, quality and quantity of individual’s social interactions, and leadership traits, while risk aversion and cognitive reflection were measured using…
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29/01 - Seminar by Dorothea Kubler

Seminar


Dorothea Kübler

Berlin Social Science Center (WZB)

Wednesday, 30th January @ 3:30 PM
“How Lotteries in School Choice Help to Level the Playing Field”
The use of lotteries is advocated to desegregate schools. We study lottery quotas embedded in the two most common school choice mechanisms, namely deferred and immediate acceptance mechanisms. Some seats are allocated based on merit (e.g., grades) and some based on lottery draws. We focus on the effect of the lottery quota on truth-telling, the utility of students, and the student composition at schools, using theory and…
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21/01 - Colloquium by Stephen Nei

Colloquium


Stephen Nei

University of Oxford

Tuesday, 22nd January @ 1:30 PM
“Accounting for Selection in Social Learning”
Much of the information people use in their day-to-day lives comes not from a primary source but from communication with one’s peers. Assuming there are benefits to gathering information (e.g., improvements in decisions made) as well as costs (e.g., time and effort), economic theory would suggest that agents optimize their decisions of how much information…
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18/01 - Hilary 2019

Dear all,

Welcome back to Hilary 2019. We have lots of great events lined up for you this term so buckle up and get ready to do some experimental social science!

Colloquia & Seminars


 

Colloquium


Stephen Nei

 

22nd January @ 1:30 PM

“Accounting for Selection in Social Learning.”

 

Seminar


Dorothea Kübler

 

30th January @ 3:30 PM

“How Lotteries in School Choice Help to Level the Playing Field.”

 

Colloquium


Dominik Duell

 

12th February @ 1:30 PM

“The World on One Island: Formation and Deployment of Group Membership in Multi-Identity Societies.”

 

Seminar


Roberto Weber

 

13th February @ 3:30 PM

TBA

 

Colloquium


Jan Sauermann

 

19th February @ 1:30 PM

“The Effects of Communication on the Occurrence of the Tyranny of the Majority under Voting by Veto.”

 

Colloquium


Scott A. Tyson

 

26th February @ 1:30 PM

“Sowing the Seeds: A Theory of Indoctrination and Counterinsurgency”

 

Seminar


Karine Van Der Straeten

 

27th February @ 3:30 PM

TBA

 

Colloquium


Saurabh Pant

 

5th March @ 1:30 PM

“Winning Hearts and Minds in Civil Wars: Governance, Leadership Change, and Support for Violence in Iraq.”

 

Seminar


Jan-Emmanuel de Neve
Clément Imbert

 

6th March @ 3:30 PM

“How to Improve Tax Compliance? Evidence from Countrywide Experiments in Belgium.”

 

Colloquium


Leah Rosenzweig

 

19th March @ 1:30 PM

TBA

Term Visiting Scholars


 

Alexei Zakharov

Associate Professor of Economics, National Research University Higher School of Economics

 

Karine Van Der Straeten

Senior researcher at French National Centre for Scientific Research, Toulouse School of Economics

 

Leah Rosenzweig

Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST)

 

Stephen Nei

Postdoctoral Prize Research Fellow at the University of Oxford

 

Vera Troeger

Professor of Quantitative Political Economy, University of Warwick

New Affiliated Graduate Students


 

Mats Ahrenshop

Mphil student, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

 

Roberto Cerina

PhD student, Department of Sociology, University of Oxford

 

Constantin Reinprecht

PhD student, Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

 

Tom Robinson

Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Oxford

 

Felipe Torres

PhD student, Political Economy, Kings College London

 

James Walsh

PhD student, Blavatnik School of Government, University of Oxford

We are pleased to announce the Sixth International Meeting on Experimental and Behavioral Social Sciences (IMEBESS) at the Utrecht University, Utrecht city in Netherlands, on May 2-4 2019.

IMEBESS intends to bring together researchers in all areas of the social sciences who are interested in experimental methods. We believe that behavioural economics is increasingly informed by a very diverse range of research traditions. Hence, we are particularly interested in the participation of all social science disciplines with an interest in experimental and behavioural research, including anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, and sociology.

Read more about IMEBESS conference by clicking in the button below.

IMEBESS 2019 website

 

Participate in CESS experiments

 

 

Are you interested in making money while contributing to the research of the University of Oxford? Then read on.

 

The Centre for Experimental Social Sciences (CESS) is an inter-disciplinary research Centre at Oxford University engaged in laboratory experimental work in the social sciences. The research tools used in the Centre are laboratory and online experiments in which paid human subjects engage in decision-making tasks. For our online experiments, participants are invited to visit a webpage and answer some surveys, while for our laboratory experiments, participants come to our laboratory.

Click in the button below to sign up for laboratory and online experiments:

Participate in experiments

Registration is not binding, and you can always opt out of the experiments you have been invited to participate in.